LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES

Too many neighbors in our ward and our city are struggling. As Alderman, I am fighting for a vision of Chicago where everyone—regardless of means—lives safely and comfortably. My top priorites on the Council are advocating for affordable housing, neighborhood schools, public safety, ethics reform at City Hall, and environmental justice.

 
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With property taxes on the rise, homes in the Ward are becoming increasingly unaffordable—especially for seniors on a fixed income, working-class families, and recent graduates.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Scale back property taxes and implement a progressive city income tax that better addresses the widening wealth gap in Chicago.
  • Raise affordability minimums in new developments.
  • Distribute more vouchers to our middle- and low-income neighbors to help offset the rising cost of rents in the area.
 
 
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All children need and deserve access to high-quality neighborhood public schools, regardless of their parent’s ability to fundraise.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Fully fund our schools so that all students have modest class sizes and access to up-to-date technology and textbooks. We can achieve this by introducing a progressive city income tax, modifying the existing tax on large downtown real estate sales, and re-amortizing existing pension debt.
  • Hold more hearings to prevent and confront crises like abuse of students, insufficient access to special education services, and poorly cleaned schools.
  • Have an elected school board, instead of one appointed by the Mayor.
 
 
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Our police department badly needs reform. Let's make sure to provide officers with proper training and supervision, and hold them accountable when misconduct occurs.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Implement systems of meaningful civilian oversight over the Chicago Police Department
  • Collaborate with the 19th and 20th police districts to reduce incidents when there are no available units to respond to 911 calls.
  • Adopt a holistic approach to public safety that prioritizes job opportunities, stable housing, and quality education for at-risk youth.
 
 

Chicago politics as usual isn't working for Chicagoans. We need a more transparent, accountable city government that works for our communities.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Help eliminate conflicts of interest, like Alderman Burke's property tax law firm, by banning secondary employment.
  • Reform campaign financing and publicly finance elections to create fairer, more competitive elections, and reduce the pernicious influenece of machine politicians, corporations, developers, and other special interests.
  • Empower the Inspector General and enable them to audit and investigate City Council.
 
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Chicago must lead the way in addressing the environmental challenges that face us.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Embrace the Sierra Club’s Ready for 100 plan and increase our share of renewable energy.
  • Prioritize replacing lead water pipes in our schools, and immediately hold hearings.
  • Promote environmental impact assessments and require community consultation on industrial projects.

OTHER PRIORITIES

 
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Many of us love living in the 47th Ward because of its dynamic retail corridors, but vacant storefronts and decreased foot traffic are hurting businesses.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Distribute easy-to-obtain pop-up licenses to artists, first-time entrepreneurs, and businesses that only have an online presence.
  • Collaborate with local chambers of commerce to identify and attract new businesses that will complement existing ones.
  • Replenish lost density by building more apartments close to businesses and transit stops.
 
 
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Neither gender nor sexual orientation status should ever present a hurdle to personal or professional happiness.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Pass ordinances that guarantee fair scheduling and paid family leave for biological, adoptive, and foster parents.
  • Require prospective and current city contractors to guarantee pay equity and freedom from harassment. 
  • Require City Hall, City Council, and each of the 22 CPD districts to employ a dedicated LGBTQ liaison.
 
 
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City government must ensure our neighborhood is as clean and accessible as possible.

WHAT CAN WE DO:

  • Build more dedicated bus lanes in major transit corridors to induce demand and increase ridership.
  • Expand the number of covered bus shelters that feature accurate wait times.
  • Review practices that result in disproportionate numbers of tickets to bike riders in low-income, infrastructure-poor neighborhoods.